slide
menu
slide
News: Navy Senior Officers Vote 3-0 to Retain C&J Client Lt. David Nartker
On Tuesday, April 18, 2017, a three member separation panel for the United States Navy voted unanimously to retain C&J client Lieutenant David Nartker, rejecting recommendations from commanders to discharge Lt. Nartker from the Navy.  Lt. Nartker had been under investigation by the Navy following an incident in January 2016 when he and ten other sailors under his command, who were transiting over 260 miles through the Persian Gulf, unknowingly strayed into Iranian waters.  Following an investigation, the Navy sought to take certain steps to punish Lt. Nartker, including criminal punishment, as well as discharge from the Navy.  Lt. Nartker's counsel, led by C&J attorney Phillip E. Lowry, demanded court martial rather than to allow the criminal charges against Lt. Nartker to proceed.  In response, the Navy amended its charges against Lt. Nartker, and Lt. Nartker agreed to proceed to nonjudicial punishment on three of the original 12 charges against him.  

The punishment imposed on Lt. Nartker set the scene for a two-day hearing in front of a three-officer separation panel in San Diego, California to determine whether Lt. Nartker would be allowed to remain in the Navy.  At the hearing, Lt. Nartker was represented by Mr. Lowry, Navy counsel Lt. Allan Thorson, and C&J associate Bryson Brown.  Following the two-day hearing, where the three-officer panel focused mostly on the 780-page report the Navy had prepared, the three-officer panel voted 3-0 to retain Lt. Nartker.

In an interview with Foreign Policy magazine, Mr. Lowry said, "It’s an exoneration by the rank and file of the Navy.  His peers have looked at this, and they have decided that this doesn't warrant separation, they want to keep him as a colleague."  When asked about Lt. Nartker's future, Mr. Lowry told the Navy Times that, "We don’t know how he’ll be reassigned or when — the Navy personnel machine has to figure that out — but essentially the flag will be removed and he’ll continue on with his career."

To read more about Lt. Nartker's story, as well as the tremendous efforts set forth by C&J attorneys Phil Lowry and Bryson Brown, read here and here.
More news stories:
Nate Alder finishes second term of service with Judicial Performance Evaluation Commission
Nate Alder completed his second term (total of six years) of service on the Judicial Performance Evaluation Commission.  Utah Governor Gary R. Herbert appointed Nate to this independent body in 2011.
read more...
Tanner Lenart interprets Utah’s peculiar liquor laws so the rest of us don’t have to
Christensen & Jensen Attorney Tanner Lenart was featured in Salt Lake City Weekly today to get her take on Utah liquor laws.  Tanner helps restaurateurs, bartenders and patrons understand the laws passed during Utah's short annual legislative session this year. 
read more...
Nate Alder named as one of Utah State Aggies' ten most influential alumni
The Utah Statesman, the student-led newspaper at Utah State University, has named C&J’s Nate Alder as one of Utah State’s ten most influential alumni. It solicited and gathered nominations for its “50 Most Influential Aggies” to identify individuals for their list.
read more...
Geoff Haslam, Nate Alder, and Karra Porter speak at Utah Association for Justice Event
Geoff Haslam and Nate Alder were speakers at a nuts & bolts seminar sponsored by the Utah Association for Justice titled, "When is Mediation Useful and How to Make it Most Effective."  Karra Porter spoke in the afternoon on "Preserving Matters for Appeal During Trial and What Happens After Verdict."
read more...
0.1